Scenarios Overview

Bright Pattern Documentation

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Scenario Builder Overview

For every customer interaction that enters your contact center, Bright Pattern Contact Center software has to process that specific interaction to determine what to do with it (e.g., what prompts or announcements to apply, what resources to queue for, what music to play, or when to over-flow to alternate resources). The logic of such automated interaction processing is defined in a scenario. Execution of a scenario with respect to a specific interaction is triggered by a particular event, such as the arrival of a call at a specific access number, or the initiation of a chat session from a specific web page.

Scenarios are designed and edited in the Scenario Builder application. This application is launched from the Contact Center Administrator application when you add a new scenario or select an existing one for editing. For more information, see section Scenarios Overview of the Bright Pattern Contact Center Administrator Guide.


Scenario Builder


Scenario Engine

The Scenario Engine is the component of Bright Pattern Contact Center software that executes your scenarios. Starting from version 5.0, should scenario failover occur (i.e., the Scenario Engine fails while processing a Voice scenario), the scenario will be transferred to a backup Scenario Engine; this will restart the scenario from the last executed block and prevent active, connected calls from being disconnected.

The following are some examples of what can occur at various stages of scenario failover:

Note: Real-time statistics are incrementially affected by scenario failovers in some instances. For example, for queued calls, one inbound call will increase statistic value by two (e.g., the first time when it was queued by original Scenario Engine, the second time when it was switched over to new Scenario Engine).

Graphical User Interface

Scenario Builder incorporates a graphical user interface (GUI) with which you can visually connect a sequence of functional blocks, thus building your scenario. These blocks are known as scenario blocks. Scenarios are created using a flowchart format that represents the sequence of interaction processing steps in the scenario. Different scenario blocks perform different functions, such as playing prompts, collecting digits, or looking for available agents.

To add a block to the scenario, select it from the list on the left and drag it to the desired location within the scenario. To remove a block from a scenario, select the block within the scenario and drag it back to the list of blocks on the left.

Scenario Blocks

Each block has its own configuration attributes, which appear in the edit pane on the right when the block is added to the flowchart or selected within the flowchart. The attributes specify the function represented by the block. For example, the Play Prompt block has an attribute that specifies which prompt shall be played when this block is executed in a specific processing step of a specific scenario. The scenario blocks described in this guide may have configuration attributes related to conditional exits, prompts, and/or settings.

Conditional Exits

The scenario typically processes blocks sequentially; however, some blocks have multiple paths that the scenario can take after processing the block. These paths are called conditional exits. Conditional exits enable you to determine how the voice scenario responds to certain conditions that may occur during the processing of an interaction, such as an agent not responding to a call. Each conditional exit appears in the flowchart as green text beneath the block to which it applies. A conditional exit may contain a flow of blocks to handle specific situations.

Prompts

Many blocks use voice prompts to request input from callers, inform callers about events, or play music while callers are waiting for an agent. These prompts can be either prerecorded audio files or static prompts that the system generates using Text-to-Speech (TTS) functionality from textual prompt descriptions. The Prompt Manager dialog box in Scenario Builder lists all prompts the open voice scenario uses, and it lets you set the languages in which the voice scenario can play prompts.

Settings

Settings, also known as configuration attributes, for this block appear in the edit pane on the right when the block is added to the flowchart or selected within the flowchart. These settings specify the function represented by the block.

The subsequent sections of this guide describe specific scenario blocks, their attributes, and usage. The blocks are listed in alphabetical order.



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Scenario Builder Overview

For every customer interaction that enters your contact center, Bright Pattern Contact Center software has to process that specific interaction to determine what to do with it (e.g., what prompts or announcements to apply, what resources to queue for, what music to play, or when to over-flow to alternate resources). The logic of such automated interaction processing is defined in a scenario. Execution of a scenario with respect to a specific interaction is triggered by a particular event, such as the arrival of a call at a specific access number, or the initiation of a chat session from a specific web page.

Scenarios are designed and edited in the Scenario Builder application. This application is launched from the Contact Center Administrator application when you add a new scenario or select an existing one for editing. For more information, see section Scenarios Overview of the Bright Pattern Contact Center Administrator Guide.


Scenario Builder


Scenario Engine

The Scenario Engine is the component of Bright Pattern Contact Center software that executes your scenarios. Starting from version 5.0, should scenario failover occur (i.e., the Scenario Engine fails while processing a Voice scenario), the scenario will be transferred to a backup Scenario Engine; this will restart the scenario from the last executed block and prevent active, connected calls from being disconnected.

The following are some examples of what can occur at various stages of scenario failover:

Note: Real-time statistics are incrementially affected by scenario failovers in some instances. For example, for queued calls, one inbound call will increase statistic value by two (e.g., the first time when it was queued by original Scenario Engine, the second time when it was switched over to new Scenario Engine).

Graphical User Interface

Scenario Builder incorporates a graphical user interface (GUI) with which you can visually connect a sequence of functional blocks, thus building your scenario. These blocks are known as scenario blocks. Scenarios are created using a flowchart format that represents the sequence of interaction processing steps in the scenario. Different scenario blocks perform different functions, such as playing prompts, collecting digits, or looking for available agents.

To add a block to the scenario, select it from the list on the left and drag it to the desired location within the scenario. To remove a block from a scenario, select the block within the scenario and drag it back to the list of blocks on the left.

Scenario Blocks

Each block has its own configuration attributes, which appear in the edit pane on the right when the block is added to the flowchart or selected within the flowchart. The attributes specify the function represented by the block. For example, the Play Prompt block has an attribute that specifies which prompt shall be played when this block is executed in a specific processing step of a specific scenario. The scenario blocks described in this guide may have configuration attributes related to conditional exits, prompts, and/or settings.

Conditional Exits

The scenario typically processes blocks sequentially; however, some blocks have multiple paths that the scenario can take after processing the block. These paths are called conditional exits. Conditional exits enable you to determine how the voice scenario responds to certain conditions that may occur during the processing of an interaction, such as an agent not responding to a call. Each conditional exit appears in the flowchart as green text beneath the block to which it applies. A conditional exit may contain a flow of blocks to handle specific situations.

Prompts

Many blocks use voice prompts to request input from callers, inform callers about events, or play music while callers are waiting for an agent. These prompts can be either prerecorded audio files or static prompts that the system generates using Text-to-Speech (TTS) functionality from textual prompt descriptions. The Prompt Manager dialog box in Scenario Builder lists all prompts the open voice scenario uses, and it lets you set the languages in which the voice scenario can play prompts.

Settings

Settings, also known as configuration attributes, for this block appear in the edit pane on the right when the block is added to the flowchart or selected within the flowchart. These settings specify the function represented by the block.

The subsequent sections of this guide describe specific scenario blocks, their attributes, and usage. The blocks are listed in alphabetical order.



Voice

To create or edit voice scenarios, select the Voice option from the Scenarios menu.

You can use the right pane of the Scenarios > Voice view to manage associations of voice scenarios with access numbers (i.e., to create and edit dial-in scenario entries).


Screen Properties

The Voice screen properties are organized into two tabs: Scenario Entries and Associations. They are described as follows.

Scenario Entries tab

List of dial-in scenario entries

This is a list of the dial-in scenario entries where the selected scenario is used.

Note that if a scenario is associated with more than one number within the same entry, only one number will be displayed in the list. If both external and internal access numbers are associated with a scenario within the same entry, the internal number will be displayed. To see the full set of numbers associated with a selected scenario within the same entry, see the entry properties below the list.

Dial-in scenario entry properties

Dial-in scenario entry properties are the properties of the dial-in scenario entry selected in the List of dial-in scenario entries. For a description of these properties, see section Scenario Entries - Dial-in.

You can edit these properties or define a new entry for the selected scenario in this view.


Associations tab

List of associations

List of associations lists all contact resources that are referred to in this scenario, such as skills and services. This may be useful, for example, when you use the same scenarios in several separate environments (e.g., development, staging, and production).


Voice Scenario Templates

The following scenario examples (templates) are available to support the development of voice scenarios:

Auto-Attendant

This scenario fragment connects an incoming call to an extension number that the caller enters via IVR.

Campaign Return Calls

This scenario can be used to process inbound calls that customers make in response to missed campaign calls. The scenario offers an opt-out option to the callers.

Customer Survey

This scenario fragment prompts the customer to evaluate the call that just ended using the standard first call resolution, customer satisfaction, and net promoter score parameters.

External Agent Dial-in

This scenario is started when an agent logs into the system with option Dial-in and keep line open. The scenario collects the info necessary for user authentication and plays a confirmation message.

IVR Campaign

This scenario is started when a call attempt from an automatic (IVR) outbound campaign is answered. The scenario sets a disposition and plays a message to the called party.

Inbound Service

This scenario routes an inbound service call. The scenario checks call arrival time against service hours, offers service selection, routes calls to a qualified agent based on selected service parameters (skills), and performs a screen-pop.

Predictive Telemarketing Campaign

This scenario is started when a call attempt from a predictive outbound campaign is answered. In compliance with the U.S. telemarketing regulations, the scenario attempts to distribute the answered call to an agent within the compliance time (2 seconds). Calls that cannot be answered within the compliance time are routed to an interactive voice response (IVR) script that offers an opt-out option to the called party. Called parties who opt out are added to the internal DNC list.

Right Party Connect Campaign

This scenario is started when a call attempt from a Right Party Connect (RPC) predictive outbound campaign is answered. The scenario verifies whether the person who answers the call is the intended party, and if so, connects this call to an agent. Otherwise, the scenario verifies if the intended party is unavailable or this is a wrong number and sets the corresponding disposition.

Salesforce Integration Example

This scenario returns Salesforce data based on the case number that the caller provides via IVR and provides it as a screen pop to the selected agent.

Virtual Queue (Callback)

This scenario fragment implements the virtual queue function for an inbound/blended service.

Note that this template is designed to support callback numbers of the North American Dialing Plan (NDAP) only.

Voice Prompt Recording

This scenario facilitates over-the-phone recording of a voice message that is stored as a shared voice segment and can be used in other scenarios (e.g., in automatic outbound campaigns). For more information, see section Shared Voice Segments.

Voice Signature

Voice Signature is an example of an IVR script that the agent can conference into a customer call to facilitate collection of customer’s voice signature. For more information, see the description of property Enable voice signature flag in section Services and Campaigns - Properties Tab.



Chat

To create or edit chat scenarios, select the Chat option from the Scenarios menu. This covers Zendesk live chat as well as Salesforce.com chat integrations. Upon selecting Chat, your screen will be updated as shown.


Scenarios > > Chat


You can use the right pane of the Scenarios > Chat view to manage associations of chat scenarios with web pages (i.e., to create and edit chat scenario entries).

The Chat screen properties are provided in two tabs: Scenario Entries and Associations. The properties for each tab are described as follows.


Scenario Entries tab

List of Messaging/Chat Scenario Entries

This is a list of the Messaging/Chat scenario entries where the selected scenario is used.

Messaging/Chat Scenario Entry Properties

These are the properties of the messaging/chat scenario entry selected in the List of Messaging/Chat scenario entries. For a description of these properties, see section Messaging/Chat.

You can edit these properties or define a new entry for the selected scenario in this view.w.


Associations tab

List of associations

List of associations is a list of all contact resources that are referred to in this scenario, such as skills and services. This may be useful, for example, when you use the same scenarios in several separate environments (e.g., development, testing, and production).


Chat Scenario Templates

A template is a great place to start if you have not already created a chat scenario, or if you need a quick way to create a new scenario.

In the following scenario example, the Mobile Chat template is used to support the development of chat scenarios.

The Mobile Chat scenario can be adjusted to be used for either web or mobile chats. It starts when a customer requests a chat conversation with a contact center. It requests customer data via a web form, and it connects a qualified agent. At the end of the chat session, if offers a survey form to the customer and sends the transcript to the customer.

To use a template, click the Add from template icon Add from template icon at the bottom of the screen. In the pop-up window that appears, select the desired template to use. Click OK. In this example, the selected template is "Mobile Chat."


Select template pop-up window


Clicking OK will launch the Scenario Builder application in a separate browser window or tab (depending on your settings).

Scenario Builder provides a powerful way to customize the sequence of actions in a scenario. This is where you view the template and customize its building blocks (i.e., prompts) to suit your workflow. The Scenario Builder displays all available building blocks (e.g., Find Agent, Send Message, Connect Chat, etc.) in a list on the left-hand panel of the screen. These represent the actions that could occur during an interaction with a customer, and they are dragged and dropped from the Prompts list on the left onto any area on the scenario panel to the right. To remove a block, simply drag it to the left, back onto the Prompts list.


Scenario Builder from template


Refer to the Scenario Builder Overview Reference Guide for detailed descriptions of scenario blocks and how to use them.




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